Subject Areas

Click through the subject areas below…

Art

Art and design in Stanley School stimulates children’s creativity and imagination. It provides visual, tactile and sensory experiences and a way of understanding and responding to the world. It enables children to communicate what they see, feel and think through the use of colour, texture, form, pattern and different materials and processes.

Children become involved in shaping their environments through art and design activities. They learn to make informed judgements and aesthetic and practical decisions. They explore ideas and meanings through the work of artists and designers. Through learning about the roles and functions of art, they can explore the impact it has had on the world around them, and that of different times and cultures.

Topics from the three year rolling programme are designed to support creative development and be cross curricular in their nature. These topics include art and the environment, printing and textiles, paint effects, patterns and colour in African art, recycled art, printing and collage, still life drawing and painting. Artists studied include Andy Goldsworthy, Monet, Archimbaldo, Georgia O’Keefe, Van Gogh, Andy Warhol and LS Lowry.

Art activities allow children to work alone or as part of a group. They can interact with each other, develop new skills and feel a sense of accomplishment in their creativity.

DT
We hold a Christmas Market event every December. The children really enjoy making Christmas gifts in their Design & Technology lessons and they sell them for a profit at the event. This year we raised over £1400 for our school.

Click to view the DT Curriculum Area

Geography

Geography helps our pupils to develop an understanding of their own surroundings and to experience some differences of life in other parts of the country and in different countries. The care of the environment, the purpose of local features and landmarks as well as how the weather effects people’s lives’, are included in the scheme of work.( see three year topic plan.) It is taught according to QCA guidelines and agreed by all staff in curriculum meetings. The school curriculum and assessment document which is related to P levels provides a step by step framework for teaching in a differentiated form. As a staff we feel that for our children to maximize their geographical understanding, that the approach should be as ‘hands on’ as possible. For this to happen children are given opportunity for geographical experiences, e.g. taking the register, exploring areas around school, or being taken further afield on planned class, department or whole school visit, of either a half or full day. A list of places visited and trips out are kept in class teachers planning files and a list is kept by the deputy head. When this is not possible e.g. when another country is being studied, children will have the opportunity to see and touch artefacts, taste different foods, hear music, dress in costumes etc, as well as making use of museums, and galleries e.g. ‘when studying ‘Africa’, children visit The World Museum to see the Africa section and the maritime museum to have a multi sensory experience of a museum led session based the story ‘Handa’s Surprise’. Children complete Geography topics following the three year plan for their key stage.

Cross curricular links include ICT as classes use digital cameras and class videos to record visits or learning in different parts of the school, art as children record places they have been, design technology as pupils make models and figure, as well as English including speaking and listening, as children have opportunity to discuss their visits and experiences.

History

History at Stanley begins with children understanding the history or past of themselves, their families, friends and then developing to how other people lived their lives in the past. And how it was like to live in the past. History is taught following three year plans for Key Stages 1+2 and are regularly discussed in curriculum meetings (see three year topic plans). It is taught according to QCA guidelines and agreed by all staff in curriculum meetings.

The school curriculum and assessment document which is related to P levels provides a step by step framework for teaching in a differentiated form. As a staff we feel that for our children to maximise their historical understanding, that the approach should be as ‘hands on’ as possible. For this to happen children are given opportunity for
Historical experiences, e.g. trying on clothes and items worn from the past, preparing and tasting foods people ate and being taken on planned class, department or whole school visit, of either a half or full day e.g. to museums or National Trust houses.

A list of places visited and trips out are kept in class teachers planning files and a list is kept by the deputy head. Children have the opportunity to see and touch artefacts, taste different foods, hear music, dress in costumes etc, for periods being studied. Children complete History topics following the three year plan for their key stage, with cross curricular links including ICT as classes use digital cameras and class videos to record visits , art as children record places they have been, design technology as pupils make models and figures, as well as English including speaking and listening, as children have opportunity to discuss their visits and experiences.

Literacy

Literacy

Class teachers are responsible for delivering the literacy curriculum in line with the National Curriculum 2014. Writing and reading are taught through individual IEP targets in Key Stage 1 and 2.

Reading

Pupils learn to read following a structured approach which is used throughout the school. They acquire an early sight vocabulary of approximately 20 words using the Stanley Scheme before moving on to Oxford Reading Tree. Pupils are encouraged to read every day. They work through the scheme until Stage 12 by which time they are fluent and confident readers. They will have developed phonic and comprehension skills and experienced a variety of texts. The reading scheme is also available on individual iPads and Class Smart boards to make access universal.

We have a fully stocked library which provides a good range of nationally recommended authors and texts, which cover a wide range of genres. Also available are big book texts, a variety of boxed subject cross curricular texts and sensory story boxes.

Writing

Children enhance their writing skills via twice weekly topic related writing sessions. These topics include access to poetry , fiction and non fiction, traditional tales and reference materials. During writing lessons children are supported in small group or 1:1 tasks to work towards personalised learning outcomes.

children working at low P levels are supported to use communication in print to select and order symbols in relation to a familiar experience or event. As the pupils progress they are encouraged to begin to offer suggestions for composing their own short phrases and sentences. From Level One children are taught to sequence several sentences developing their own composition to include punctuation connectives and beginnings, middles and ends of stories.

Each lesson is topic related and includes a short starter activity to stimulate the children’s imagination. Follow up tasks are differentiated and personalised to ensure all children are challenged and make progress in each session.

All Literacy lessons are planned by Teaching staff who update targets and learning outcomes with the class support staff. The class teacher oversees the delivery of all learning experiences which are also delivered by teaching assistants. Literacy lessons are designed to be cross curricular and incorporate the use of ICT. Where possible the schools policy for daily learning outside the classroom is incorporated into the children’s learning programmes.

Music

Music at Stanley School aims to support the emotional and developmental well being of our pupils through a creative, interactive curriculum. In particular it is used as a tool to promote the following :

SELF ESTEEM by offering opportunities for every pupil to succeed according to their individual level of ability, encouraging leadership and allowing pupils to make and explore their own choices in creative activities.

VOCAL CONFIDENCE by encouraging pupils to explore their own voices through singing and play.

COMMUNICATION through action songs/rhymes, call and response games, vocal activities and ensemble tasks requiring turn taking, awareness of others and attention to visual and auditory information. Pecs, Makaton and electronic communication aids allow all pupils to access and contribute to group activities.

LISTENING SKILLS by exploring sounds made by ourselves and others. Children are encouraged to develop aural differentiation through structured percussion activities and listening games.

SENSORY AWARENESS AND /TOLERANCE by allowing pupils to experience music from a variety of genres enhanced through visual and tactile stimuli.

PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT in singing activities by teaching children breath control– a skill which has significant relevance for pupils who need to learn relaxation techniques. Percussion work also promotes development of hand eye co-ordination and physical dexterity/control.

National Curriculum/Pivat lesson objectives are identified by the teacher/ HLTA planning the units of work according to the individual needs of children in their group. Whilst some units of work develop listening, applying knowledge and understanding through the interrelated skills of performing, composing and appraising many activities are planned to focus on skills in isolation. This is often more effective in supporting our pupils’ learning needs.
When planning for units of work the lesson objectives from the Early Years Creative Development goals and National Curriculum Key Stage 1 programme of study are used. However, the following skills are highlighted as learning objectives which are particularly relevant to our pupils .

STEADY BEAT– awareness and ability to create a steady beat are significant factors in development of language rhythms and patterns. This skill is promoted through body percussion activities, action songs and games to maximize pupil ability to internalize rhythms and extend basic rhythm skills to percussion work.

VOCAL SKILLS/SIGNING– children are encouraged to use their voices expressively in a secure, fun environment. Controlled breathing and dynamic control support vocal development. For both verbal and non verbal pupils singing is an effective way to learn Makaton signs and signed songs ensure a fully inclusive and interactive group experience for all.

PLAYING TUNED AND UNTUNED INSTRUMENTS – Pupils are encouraged to explore contrasting sounds and effects to develop listening skills, sensory stimulation and physical control .
RECORDED MUSIC – Some classes use a colour coded sensory week timetable which includes a different style of music each day of the week. Children experience recorded music from a range of cultures and traditions in their music lessons.
LIVE MUSIC – Opportunities to listen to and take part in live music experience are available through workshops , projects and concerts. These have typically included the Gospel singing project with Urban Voice, the samba workshop on our South American Day, Liverpool Philharmonic schools concerts and interactive concerts in school eg Irish music. Pupils also have opportunities to perform for and with their peers in the Merseyside SLD music festival and Wirral sign-along each year.

PE

Click to view the PE Curriculum Area

Some pupils from Key Stage 2 went to Woodchurch High School and took part in a Boccia competition. They all had great fun!!

 

Classes in KS2 this year have had the opportunity to work with Everton. Class 13 today enjoyed learning rugby skills. 

Some pupils from Key stage 2 enjoyed taking part in the Everton Olympic day. They participated in a variety of different sports. Their favourite was the sitting volleyball. 

PSHE
We have met a dentist and dental nurse to help us to learn about dental hygiene.

Key Stage 2 were very lucky to meet our local Police Community Support Officers! We learned about stranger danger and how to stay safe.

Click to view the Computing Curriculum Area

RE

Religious Education has a significant (although not exclusive) role in the development of our pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development. Pupils will be encouraged to:
express views openly and honestly;
listen to and evaluate opinions;
develop their own personal values and learn to appreciate the beliefs, values and practices of others;
value imagination, inspiration and contemplation;
experience a sense of awe and wonder;
increase their knowledge, understanding of intentions, attitude and behaviour in relation what is right and wrong;
extend their understanding of the religious aspects of their culture and those of others;
develop a context and vocabulary for spiritual, moral, social and cultural understanding.

Pupils can benefit from meeting and listening to visitors to school.
Visits to places of worship can also be a form of active learning as can making and tasting food, testing the feeling of silence, listening to sounds and  conducting surveys and interviews.
All teachers at school aim to set tasks which enable pupils to discuss and communicate understanding in a  variety of ways.
Cross – curricula
Some units of work may also be linked to other areas of the curriculum or themes.
R.E. can be enriched with forms of dance, art, drama, ICT, music and scientific observation. These can help with pupils developing, understanding and make effective use of curriculum time.
R.E. is especially linked to the use of language and the development of language and communication skills.

In R.E. pupils experience a powerful, rich and distinctive range of language whether written, spoken or enhanced such as stories, poetry, texts, prayers, creeds, history, worship and liturgy.
They will have the opportunity to listen to, read, talk about and reflect on sacred texts and other printed sources and where appropriate they may listen to/write poetry and prose and participate in role play.
RE Topics are alternated with PSHE and taught on a needs led basis. During RE lessons pupils are encouraged to experience and explore a range of festivals and cultures via  three year rolling programme. These Topics include Harvest, Diwali, Christmas, Chinese New Year, The Bible, Easter, Buddhism, The Natural World, Hanukkah, Islam, Holi, Our Planet and Christianity. RE lessons are deigned to be practical and multi-sensory offering a  range of activities to support the children’s knowledge and understanding during each unit of work. During Programmes of study for RE pupils visit a number of places beyond the class base these can include, cathedral, mosque, synagogue and churches. Children also visit the schools themed room which is developed to support a range of topics and updated on a termly basis. Follow up tasks are designed to be delivered in a multi sensory manner with more formal recordings delivered at an appropriate and personal level.

Click to view the RE Curriculum Area

Science

Science is the study of the physical world. It involves a collection of facts from observations, physical experiments and working scientifically. Such learning experiences help children to form ideas about the world around them. We believe that it is good practice for children to be encouraged to actively learn, through exploratory and investigative experiences and activities to develop their own ideas.

The science schemes of work at Stanley School have been devised in a way which ensures even coverage of the National Curriculum.

Early Years will access the science curriculum as appropriate when looking at ‘Understanding the World’ as part of the Early Years Curriculum.

Each class in Key Stage 1 and 2 have one lesson of science per week.
Key Stage 1 incorporate science into their topic based programme of study. They cover the key areas as stated in the National Curriculum and deliver this in a meaningful, cross curricular approach.

The long-term plan maps the science modules studied over a three year rolling programme at Key Stage 2. Key Stage 2 learn about the following topic areas; ‘Electricity’, ‘Light’, ‘States of Matter’, ‘Rocks’, ‘Evolution and Inheritance’ , ‘Forces and Magnets’, ‘Living Things and their Habitats’, ‘Animals’, ‘Humans’, ‘Earth and Space’, ‘Sound’, ‘Properties and Changes of Materials’ and ‘Plants’. 

The LOTC department access science through exploration of the natural environment, taking their lessons outdoors. This enables them to cover the following topics ‘Interactions‘ in the Autumn term, ‘Materials‘ during the Spring and ‘Living Things‘ during the Summer in a rich and meaningful way.

For each topic the science coordinator disseminates supporting materials and an outline with suggested learning outcomes, activities, possible investigations and also a list of available resources related to the topic. From the planning outline, each teacher will write their own medium term plans specific to the needs of their class detailing SMART learning outcomes, activities and the use of ICT for each lesson of the topic.

All science lessons are designed to be delivered in a practical manner. Children are encouraged at an individual level to make predictions about what may happen, to experiment with prepared resources and to explore the results of their investigations. Where pupils are unable to make predictions, a multi-sensory activity is provided, enabling them to explore science at a sensory level. Children are supported on a 1:1 basis or in small groups to record the follow up of their experiments and evaluate their own learning and experiences. Here at Stanley School we pride ourselves on our ability to provide children with rich learning opportunities outside of the classroom. We see this as a key strength in enhancing children’s scientific enquiry skills and natural curiosity of the world around them.

Click to view the Science Curriculum Area

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